Tax News You Can Use

Tax Filing Season Begins January 31, 2022

Get ready for taxes: What's new and what to consider when filing in 2022

 

IR-2021-243, December 7, 2021

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today encouraged taxpayers to take important actions this month to help them file their federal tax returns in 2022, including special steps related to Economic Impact Payments and advance Child Tax Credit payments.

This is the second in a series of reminders to help taxpayers get ready for the upcoming tax filing season. A special page, updated and available on IRS.gov, outlines steps taxpayers can take now to make tax filing easier in 2022.

Here are some key items for taxpayers to consider before they file next year.

Check on advance Child Tax Credit payments

Families who received advance payments will need to compare the advance Child Tax Credit payments that they received in 2021 with the amount of the Child Tax Credit that they can properly claim on their 2021 tax return.

Taxpayers who received less than the amount for which they're eligible will claim a credit for the remaining amount of Child Tax Credit on their 2021 tax return. Taxpayers who received more than the amount for which they're eligible may need to repay some or all of the excess payment when they file.

In January 2022, the IRS will send Letter 6419 with the total amount of advance Child Tax Credit payments taxpayers received in 2021. People should keep this and any other IRS letters about advance Child Tax Credit payments with their tax records.

See Reconciling Your Advance Child Tax Credit Payments on Your 2021 Tax Return for more information.

Eligible families who did not get monthly advance payments in 2021 can still get a lump-sum payment by claiming the Child Tax Credit when they file a 2021 federal income tax return next year. This includes families who don't normally need to file a return.

Economic Impact Payments and claiming the Recovery Rebate Credit

Individuals who didn't qualify for the third Economic Impact Payment or did not receive the full amount may be eligible for the Recovery Rebate Credit based on their 2021 tax information. They'll need to file a 2021 tax return, even if they don't usually file, to claim the credit.

Individuals will also need the amount of their third Economic Impact Payment and any Plus-Up Payments received to calculate their correct 2021 Recovery Rebate Credit amount when they file their tax return. Ensuring they use the correct payment amounts will help them avoid a processing delay that may slow their refund.

In early 2022, the IRS will send Letter 6475 that contains the total amount of the third Economic Impact Payment and any Plus-Up Payments received. People should keep this and any other IRS letters about their stimulus payments with other tax records. Individuals can also log in to their IRS.gov Online Account to securely access their Economic Impact Payment amounts.

See IRS.gov/rrc for more information.

Charitable deduction changes

Taxpayers who don't itemize deductions may qualify to take a charitable deduction of up to $600 for married taxpayers filing joint returns and up to $300 for all other filers for cash contributions made in 2021 to qualifying organizations. For more information, read Publication 526, Charitable Contributions.

Get banked to get ready to direct deposit

Direct deposit gives taxpayers access to their refund faster than a paper check. Those without a bank account can learn how to open an account at an FDIC-insured bank or through the National Credit Union Locator Tool. Veterans should see the Veterans Benefits Banking Program for access to financial services at participating banks.

Links to online tools, publications and other helpful resources are available at IRS.gov/getready.

Reference: 

Get ready for taxes: What's new and what to consider when filing in 2022 | Internal Revenue Service (irs.gov)

Tax Refund Offset Information

Need to find out of your tax refund will be offset because of student loans, child support or any other reasons? Call the tax refund offset line at
1-800-304-3107.

We Provide tax prep for the following return types...

INDIVIDUAL:

*Form 1040 Individual

*Form 1040 with SchC Sole *Proprietorships

          and small business

*Form 1065 Partnership Return

CORPORATIONS:

*1120 CCorporations

*1120S SCorporations

NON PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS:

*990 Tax Exempt

OTHER FEDERAL & STATE FILINGS:

*940 Federal Unemployment Tax Filings

*Georgia Sales Tax Filings

*Tax Return Amendments

Filing Past Due Tax Returns

File all tax returns that are due, regardless of whether or not you can pay in full. File your past due return the same way and to the same location where you would file an on-time return. 

If you have received a notice, make sure to send your past due return to the location indicated on the notice you received.

Why You Should File Your Past Due Return Now

Avoid interest and penalties

File your past due return and pay now to limit interest charges and late payment penalties.

 

Claim a Refund

You risk losing your refund if you don't file your return. If you are due a refund for withholding or estimated taxes, you must file your return to claim it within 3 years of the return due date. The same rule applies to a right to claim tax credits such as the Earned Income Credit.

We hold income tax refunds in cases where our records show that one or more income tax returns are past due. We hold them until we get the past due return or receive an acceptable reason for not filing a past due return.

 

Protect Social Security Benefits

If you are self-employed and do not file your federal income tax return, any self-employment income you earned will not be reported to the Social Security Administration and you will not receive credits toward Social Security retirement or disability benefits.

 

Avoid Issues Obtaining Loans

Loan approvals may be delayed if you don't file your return. Copies of filed tax returns must be submitted to financial institutions, mortgage lenders/brokers, etc., whenever you want to buy or refinance a home, get a loan for a business, or apply for federal aid for higher education.

If You Owe More Than You Can Pay

If you cannot pay what you owe, you can request an additional 60-120 days to pay your account in full through the Online Payment Agreement application or by calling 800-829-1040; no user fee will be charged. If you need more time to pay, you can request an installment agreement or you may qualify for an offer in compromise.

Tax Refund Offset Information

 

Need to find out of your tax refund will be offset because of student loans, child support or any other reasons? Call the tax refund offset line at 1-800-304-3107.

We Provide tax prep for the following return types...

INDIVIDUAL:

*Form 1040 Individual

*Form 1040 with SchC Sole *Proprietorships

          and small business

*Form 1065 Partnership Return

CORPORATIONS:

*1120 CCorporations

*1120S SCorporations

NON PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS:

*990 Tax Exempt

OTHER FEDERAL & STATE FILINGS:

*940 Federal Unemployment Tax Filings

*Georgia Sales Tax Filings

*Tax Return Amendments

More News Coming Soon... Stay tuned...

Advanced Child Tax Credit 2021

If you received the advanced child tax credit